Looking forward to The Big Update?

We will, as always, be attending the Historic Religious Building Alliance’s The BIG UPDATE!

This year looks as exciting and informative as previous years, offering the chance to keep up to date with what’s happening to secure the future of historic religious buildings, and to meet others with similar interests and concerns. All are welcome.

There will be short, informative talks with space for questions and discussion, and time to network.

 

Speakers include (not in order of appearance):

* Keynote speaker: Sir Laurie Magnus, Chair of Historic England (a body which came into being when English Heritage split into two earlier this year)

* Philip Arundell talking about grants offered by the AllChurches Trust

* Ingrid Greenhow, talking about the ‘Taking Stock’ programme for Quaker Meeting Houses – a survey of these buildings to obtain a strategic overview of their importance and future opportunities.

* Rachel Harden, Deputy Director of Communication, Church of England, talking about effective ways of publicising a church project

* Shahed Saleem talking about the British Mosque, based on his survey of mosques and providing a foretaste of his forthcoming book

* Andy Warren of Natsol – everything you have always wanted to know about installing a compost toilet at your church

* John Winton, currently National Director of Churches Tourism Network Wales. This is soon to develop into Sanctaidd, a new organisation which will provide comprehensive support to all places of worship in Wales.

* CASE STUDY: Sara Loch and Chris Curtis on the Cupola Project in Blandford Forum

 

All are welcome.

The cost, including a full hot lunch and all refreshments, is £44.00 per person. Discounts are available to paid up members (see the booking form). Places are limited; paid up members receive priority. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any queries.

www.hrballiance.org.uk

Venue: St Alban’s Centre, Baldwins Gardens, London EC1N 7AB

 

See you there!

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National Rural Crime Network survey

Police at churchSadly, our beautiful places of worship are sometimes victims of crime.

Thanks to the many dedicated organisations helping to care for and support places of worship much progress has been made in keeping heritage crime, including attacks on places on worship, on the national police agenda. However, we need to keep up the good work.

In response to concerns from people living and working in rural areas, the National Rural Crime Network is launching the biggest ever survey of rural policing and crime, and we hope that the results will provide evidence to support our pressure to make places of worship as great a priority as farm theft and other issues with which the police are more familiar.

The National Rural Crime Network survey has received Home Office funding to undertake the rural crime and policing survey. The on-line survey will run for about five weeks and it is hoped that the findings will help shape and inform:

  • awareness of crime in rural areas
  • appropriate crime prevention
  • government policy
  • policing and partnership activities

The survey provides an opportunity to raise public awareness of crime and anti-social behaviour within the historic environment and to provide data to  help the police to integrate heritage crime into their core business and working practices. Although it is a national project and clearly not aimed specifically at places of worship it does give everyone the chance to make their case and it would be good if the places of worship perspective could be well represented in responses.

If you care for a place of worship in a rural area, please consider taking part in the survey:

http://www.nationalruralcrimenetwork.net/research/internal/national-rural-crimes-survey-2015/?member=NorthYorkshire

 

For more information about security and personal safety in places of worship please explore our new website Resource Centre.

And for some recent good news from the Churches Conservation Trust, showing that stolen items can indeed be recovered by Police if they have enough information.

Church buildings: burden, blessing and an asset for mission

Together with many Dioceses and some other national organisations we were lucky enough to receive funding from English Heritage for a Places of Worship Support Officer. Although this programme has now finished many regional PoWSO’s have been kept on by Dioceses and are continuing to give much needed support and advice to the churches they work with.

Here we welcome guest writer Andrew Mottram to introduce a new report written jointly by PoWSO’s in the West Midlands area. A discussion document based on their experience in the Dioceses of Hereford, Lichfield and Worcester from 2009 to 2015, the report is full of content and ideas which may be relevant to churches and those who care for them across the UK.

St Luke, Reddall Hill, Cradley Heath (Andrew Mottram)

Since 2011 up to seven PoWSO’s in West Midlands and Wales have met regularly and found that there were common problems frustrating their work to support Church congregations struggling with their buildings.

In addition to a widespread lack of understanding about the benefits of preventative maintenance, the main issues are the Church of England’s structures and legislative requirements – from the appointment of clergy to the closure process, all of which can hinder the effective management of church buildings.

In 2014 “I wouldn’t start from here” was produced by the four West Midlands PoWSO’s as a discussion document shared with other PoWSO’s in England. There was general agreement that the problems identified were common across the country but there were innovative solutions being considered in some dioceses.

CBBBAM is a summary of the previous discussion document and offers solutions to the issues raised. In summary there are too many buildings for the people available to manage them. This leads to neglect and to assets becoming liabilities. There needs to be a strategic approach to managing buildings, ensuring that there are creative solutions to surplus buildings and effective support for parishes in the management of their buildings.

Andrew Mottram

Download the report here.

Protecting your church during building work

In this guest post from Neal James at Panthera Security, we take a look at securing your scaffolding, building work and church from unwanted visitors. In the light of several thefts and episodes of vandalism at churches with ongoing building projects, this post is particularly timely, and we hope very useful.

Hampshire, FROXFIELD GREEN, St Peter's on the Green (2013) #001

How to protect your project

By their very nature churches are community buildings and we believe they should remain so. We know that most churches are over a hundred years old, and consequently are often in need of reparation works.

We know that most churches have alarm systems now in place and that is fine for normal use.

However, when work to your church becomes necessary you will invariably need to have a scaffold erected to provide safe work at height access to the building.

By providing that safe access to your contractor, you have also provided it to other, less than welcome visitors!

nsi-goldPanthera Security, Part of the Panthera Group have worked with the National Security Inspectorate on raising awareness to this often overlooked problem, and in developing NCP115 the Code of Practice for the Design, Installation & Maintenance of Scaffolding Alarm Systems. Panthera Group is proud to say that after a rigorous auditing process, we are the UK’s first company to become NSI Gold approved installers.

It is important to understand that it is the installer that is approved, and not the equipment, as some are led to believe.

Non-approved installers can still install scaffold alarm systems, but they are not required to adhere to the Code of Practice, therefore they may install an insufficient amount of detectors, thereby leaving access points unprotected.

Using NSI Gold approved installers will negate that problem. We always ensure that all vulnerabilities are covered and will issue an NSI Certificate of Compliance once the installation is complete.

Greater Manchester, STOCKPORT, St Mary (Ian Hamilton 2007) #003Ecclesiastical Insurance already recommends the use of NSI approved companies for all other aspects of security, and we have recently been in discussion over the introduction of NCP115 and have been assured that it is the standard they are looking to set regarding the installation of Scaffold Alarm Systems.

NCP115 compliant systems are now being requested as standard by many Quantity Surveyors, Property Managers and Local Authorities.

Let’s spread the word… Protect Our Churches

Neal James, Panthera Security

 

 

Panthera Group Ltd is a member of our Professional Trades Directory, a listing of over 60 companies and services offering a wide range of trades people who can help you with  any part of your church, chapel or meeting house. 
 
The use of trade, firm or business names in the Professional Trades Directory is for the information and convenience of the reader. Such use does not constitute an endorsement or approval by the National Churches Trust of any product or service to the exclusion of others that may be suitable.

Advice for a new churchwarden…

The best known new churchwarden in the country is in at the deep-end, raising money for the church roof.

Dot Branning Churchwarden

Dot Branning, newly appointed churchwarden of the church on Eastenders, has a lot in common with her real-life counterparts in feeling a small amount of panic in facing this daunting task.

Within the Anglican church, of which Dot is part, churchwardens are often legally responsible for all the property and movable goods belonging to a parish church. The realisation that they are responsible for a the daily upkeep of a major community space, together with the possibility of having to do major work to a building of significant heritage value can make the job seem very daunting.

However, help is at hand.

In an email to Dot last week, I detailed the support and advice we can give to churchwardens (and of course their counterparts within other denominations, and indeed anyone involved in caring for a place of worship).

It might be that Dot needs help with finding funding for the roof, or project managing the work to be done. She might want to set up a Friends Group or (somewhat ironically) encourage TV&film use of her church. Or she might need technical advice on caring for and maintaining an old building, or adapting it for community use.

All of these subjects are within the remit of my role as National Support Officer. So if, like Dot, you would like some advice please email me on sarah@nationalchurchestrust.org

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Over the years the Eastenders crew have filmed at a number of churches in and around London (mostly around Watford). Most recent, was a church in Hertfordshire, where the funeral of Derek Branning was filmed. You can see pictures from the filming here.

You can watch the episode where Dot becomes churchwarden here.

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